Driving Organizational Change

What matters most for organizational growth?

One hundred years ago,  the answer was external — Frederick Winslow Taylor, armed with a stopwatch and clipboard, anointed Efficiency as the god of organizational change. His work still echoes today as leaders across industries goad their people to do more work in less time.

But Taylor faced a small problem that often gets forgotten. Workers hated him and the mechanical yoke he imposed on them. Efficiency increased, but then so did hostility and protest. People aren't machines, particularly in jobs that require creativity and shared effort. We perform best when given autonomy to think, learn, fail safely, and grow.

In two words, mindset matters.

I help organizations shift mindset in a new way. Instead of imposing new behaviors from the outside in, we start on the inside, by looking at where each person experiences stress, friction, and discontent. This isn't a trivial sidebar to change. It is the fulcrum to change.

If you want a better organization — more cohesive, more accountable, more responsive — it won't happen in spite of the infighting, silos, and sunken morale. It will happen because of these things when your people learn how to leverage their friction as a springboard to greater insight, honesty, and change.

I'm not the only person trying to put mindset at the center of the conversation about change, but there are three things that differentiate my approach:

1. It relies on a simple 7-step technique that distills shifting mindset to its essence, making it fast and repeatable, at work, at school, and at home.

2. It comes with no stigma or jargon. This is change made accessible, engaging, and user-friendly.

3. It can be delivered in person via keynotes and executive team sessions or online at scale.

If you work for an organization ready to make mindset the focal point of change, let's talk.